Beeston Castle and Roundhouse #History #Photography


Imagine this hilltop about 1000BC. No castle of course, but the hilltop was occupied and fortified.

By 800 BC the roundhouses were built and between 650 – 250 BC an iron age hillfort was created as defences improved. Construction of the medieval castle began in 1220 AD by the Earl of Chester and these are the remains.

Archaeological excavations undertaken at Beeston Castle during the 1970s and 80s uncovered evidence of several Bronze Age roundhouses inside the castle walls. Based on the findings, the roundhouse was reconstructed in a disused quarry from traditional local materials such as oak, hazel, ash and reeds for the thatch.

The image below was borrowed from the English Heritage information board to give an idea of the size of the building. In between the three central posts was the fire pit and there could have been as many as twelve people, including children, living and working in one roundhouse. There was no opening for a ‘chimney’ for two main reasons, the smoke kept the wildlife out of the thatch and the updraft may have caused sparks to be drawn up towards the thatch and cause a fire. 

18 thoughts on “Beeston Castle and Roundhouse #History #Photography

  1. How lovely post for me, who loves art and history. Castle looks awesome. BTW, now when Coronavirus has spread, have you read The Plague by Albert Camus? It’s now topical! I suggest!

    Have a good day!

    Liked by 1 person

  2. The castle must have been stunning, as are the ruins atop the hill. The views are breathtaking! I can’t imagine living in a roundhouse, but their construction is interesting. So much has changed, but with the craziness going on here, I’d like to hide away in those ruins. 🥰

    Liked by 1 person

    • Yes, it must have been amazing. It was quite hazy that day but when it’s clear… I love getting insights into how life was so long ago. Hiding in the ruins sounds like a great idea! 😉😘

      Liked by 1 person

Thanks for visiting...feel free to share your thoughts...

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.