#GuestPost & #Extract from Margaret Skea #HistoricalFiction #wwwblogs @margaretskea1

I’m very pleased to welcome Margaret Skea, with a guest post and extract from her new book, Katharina: Deliverance, which is released today. Happy release day, Margaret, and over to you….

Sidetracked into a different world (and time).

So there I was, in March 2016, fresh from a month on a Hawthornden Fellowship – an all expenses stay in a 17th c  Scottish  castle with nothing to do but write. We were very well looked after – cooking, cleaning, clothes washing and so on all done for us – the only ‘rule’ a rule of silence in the castle from 9.00am – 6.30 pm. That, and the surroundings, made for an incredible work environment and having gone with heaps of research material, but not even the most sketchy plan for my next novel, I came home, after seventeen days of actual writing, ¼ of the way through Book 3 in my Scottish historical fiction series.  It seemed my next nine months were taken care of.

The best laid plans ‘gang oft agley’ as they say here. A couple of weeks into March I headed down to London for my first visit to London Book Fair. The buzz was energising and I managed to get individual appointments with several agents and agencies, hoping that someone would be keen on Scottish HF – after all, Outlander was proving popular…

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The Secrets We Keep ~ Faith Hogan #GuestPost #Excerpt #Giveaway @BrookCottageBks #TuesdayBookBlog

Genre: Women’s Fiction

Release Date: February  2017

Publisher: Aria Fiction – Head of Zeus

Two distant relatives, drawn together in companionship are forced to confront their pasts and learn that some people are good at keeping secrets and some secrets are never meant to be kept..

A bittersweet story of love, loss and life. Perfect for fans of Patricia Scanlan, Adele Parks and Rosamunde Pilcher.

The beautiful old Bath House in Ballytokeep has lain empty and abandoned for decades. For devoted pensioners Archie and Iris, it holds too many conflicting memories of their adolescent dalliances and tragic consequences – sometimes it’s better to leave the past where it belongs.

For highflying, top London divorce lawyer Kate Hunt, it’s a fresh start – maybe even her future. On a winter visit to see her estranged Aunt Iris she falls in love with the Bath House. Inspired, she moves to Ballytokeep leaving her past heartache 600 miles away – but can you ever escape your past or your destiny?

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#Guest Post & Extract from Sometimes The Darkness by Will Campbell @gibster1000 #FridayReads

Welcome to the Blog Tour for Sometimes The Darkness. Here Will Campbell explains the motivation behind his debut novel. Over to you, Will…

There were several factors that led to the writing of this novel. One was my passion for  current events, specifically in Africa, a continent in which I’ve always had a keen interest.  The other is my fascination with the role fate plays in our lives. 

I began writing the novel Sometimes the Darkness in 2005. At that time, the war in Darfur, which began in 2003, was receiving constant coverage by many of the news outlets at that time. It is important to remember that there were significantly less news groups in operation then as now. Even so, the war and the atrocities associated with it (as there is with every war) received much coverage, enough to draw my interest and study.

The causes of this conflict were numerous. Economics, tribalism, territorial issues, ethic/religious issues and disputes all contributed to the start and continuation of that  conflict in this western region of Sudan. Sudan, including South Sudan, formed in 2011, is the largest country on the continent. It is, by comparison, ten times larger than the United Kingdom.  Continue reading

Guest Post & #Extract ~ The Divine Heart by Danielle R Mani #YoungAdult #Paranormal

I’m pleased to welcome Danielle to BetweenTheLines today, with a guest post and extract from her book, The Divine Heart.

About the book

Seventeen-year-old Elle Collins spent most her life waiting for someone else to die…

When a heart donor is found, Elle awakes from surgery gifted with more than just a new heart—clairaudient messages and spiritual apparitions haunt her until she is convinced that she must be insane. Either that, or her donor is sending a message.

Desperate for answers the medical community can’t provide, Elle’s divination leads her to the family of her donor—a young girl named, Cas. With the help of her best friend, Rob—the guy who’s a testament that her new heart is capable of love, Elle must make sense of the clues Cas is sending. As pieces of Cas’s life and death emerge, Elle will discover that she and Cas share more than just a heart.

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#GuestPost & Extract ~ How I Motivated Myself to Succeed by @ShelleyWilson72 #SelfHelp #FridayReads

It’s my pleasure to be able to kick off the blog tour and bring you a guest post and extract from Shelley Wilson’s new book, How I motivated Myself to Succeed, which is released on Kindle today!

Welcome, Shelley…and Happy Publication Day!

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Guest Post & #Extract ~ The Island of Dreams ~ Gregory James Clark @gilbster1000 #BlogTour #TuesdayBookBlog

Welcome to my stop on the blog tour for The Island of Dreams by Gregory James Clark

About the book

In 2107, twenty-four year-old Gary Loman is disillusioned with life. There are scant opportunities in the capitalist world that surrounds him. When he receives a prestigious invitation, Gary knows that the change he has been waiting for has finally arrived; it’s a ticket to fame and glory as a skater.

Leaving the old world behind, Gary embarks on a new adventure on The Island of Dreams, led by the world’s newest monarchy, where he is introduced to the woman who will become his wife and a wildly different social order, one which has evolved over the previous seventy years by virtue of a slow, quiet and largely unnoticed revolution. By 2107, however, The Island is poised to become one of the most powerful states in the world, acquiring, most notably, the territory of Kamchatka.

The Island Queen, Queen Katie of Kamchatka, with the help of her devoted Prime Minister and her faithful staff, then attempt to educate and train the 240 receivers of the distinguished Queen’s Ticket, both for their roles as skaters and within the Kamchatskiy organisation, for whom they will be working under a completely new concept in political economy, based on quality rather than profit motives, and which is replacing Marxism as the world’s rival to capitalism. Continue reading

#GuestPost ~ Monika Jephcott Thomas #Author of Fifteen Words #Extract @gilbster1000 #Blogival #WWII

Welcome to my final spot with Clink Street’s Blogival. Today we have a guest post from Monika with her tips for writing historical fiction

One of the main difficulties of researching for historical fiction is just that – the research! Or more specifically getting bogged down in the research. Research is important of course and reality is so often stranger than fiction, which is why history provides such good fodder for novelists, but at the end of the day we are writing historical fiction. As a reader, if you want to read a history book, I would suggest you don’t pick up a novel. As a writer, I would suggest, that as soon as something you research sparks your imagination, get writing and stop researching. I often have blank spaces in the pages I write; spaces where a fact or detail needs to be added, but it is not so vital to keep me from actually writing the drama my characters are going through. Later on, after the writing is done, I can go back and fill in the blanks. The internet, being just a click away, is a very tempting and useful tool, but it can lead you down labyrinths that are a massive distraction sometimes. It’s better not to go there until after or before your actual writing time. Continue reading

Guest Post from #author Merryn Allingham #HistoricalFiction #BlogTour @MerrynWrites @HQstories

For my stop on the blog tour I’m delighted to welcome Merryn Allingham with her guest post ~ The English Country House

The English country house was at its most popular in the 19th and early 20thcenturies. It was where wealthy and aristocratic families retired once the London season came to an end. The First World War is often seen as the moment when the English country house began its sharp decline but with the outbreak of the Second World War in September, 1939, the last remaining vestiges of country house living disappeared. 

When war broke out, houses all over the country were commandeered by the Government, some for training, others for offices or research centres. The least popular option for owners was to house soldiers – and with good reason. A number of country houses were destroyed by military occupation, their interiors hacked about to make different accommodation and several burned to the ground because of carelessness. There were stories of panelling chopped up for use as kindling and jeeps being raced along wide corridors. In The Secret of Summerhayes, Alice Summer, now an old lady, is confined to a small attic apartment while the mansion she once called home is battered and scarred by military occupation. Continue reading