The Historic City of #Stirling #Photography #MondayBlogs

The approach to Stirling is impressive with this incredible view of Stirling Castle (more of the castle in a future post) perched on top of the cliff. Its position was important in the line of defence and the town was granted a Royal Charter in the 12th century. It was witness to battles against the English during the Wars of Independence, including The Battle of Stirling Bridge and Bannockburn.

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Luss ~ Lovely Village on the Shores of Loch Lomond #Photography #Scotland

Luss is a lovely little conservation village on the west coast of Loch Lomond, within the Trossachs National Park. It was used for exterior filming of the Scottish day time soap ‘Take the High Road’ during the 80s and 90s.

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St Tudno’s #Church #Photography #SundayBlogShare ~ Exploring the Great Orme

While we were exploring the Great Orme the other week we found St Tudno’s. A lovely little church with fantastic views. There’s been a place of worship on this site since the 6th century when a Celtic monk, Tudno, brought Christianity to the farming community living and working on the Great Orme. Nothing remains of the original structure, the present church was built in the 12th century and enlarged in the 15th century. 

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Penrhyn Castle ~ Part 3 ~ The Interior #Photography

The castle took over fifteen years to complete and after seeing the incredibly intricate and opulent interior I could appreciate why.

The library…

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Penrhyn Castle ~ Part 2 ~ The Setting #Photography

From its elevated vantage point, the views from Penrhyn Castle are spectacular and far reaching. From the seascape (when the tide’s in) to Llandudno Bay and the Great Orme to views over the Menai Strait and Anglesey, or inland to Snowdonia, whichever way you look there are stunning vistas.

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Penrhyn Castle ~ Part 1 ~ The Building #Photography

Penrhyn Castle, or country house as it was, is situated between the Menai Strait and Snowdonia and was built in the early 1800s on the site of, and incorporating parts of the original medieval fortified manor house and a later reconstruction. Thomas Hopper was the famous 19th century architect, well known for his unusual and elaborate designs. In this instance neo-Norman was decided upon.

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Brinkburn Priory and Manor House #Photography #SundayBlogShare @EnglishHeritage

Brinkburn Priory is tucked away in a woodland setting by the river, in the Coquet valley, Northumberland. Founded in the reign of Henry I as an Augustinian priory during the 1100s. Despite the quite remote location the Priory was frequently subjected to Scottish raids. It was one of the first monasteries to be closed during Henry VIII’s Dissolution in 1536.

The north entrance is a mixture of Norman and Early English architecture

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