#GuestPost ~ Katherine McIntyre #newrelease Of Tinkers and Technomancers (The Whitfield Files Book One) @PixieRants #TuesdayBookBlog

I’m delighted to welcome Katherine McIntyre  with a guest post and extract from her latest book, released today. Of Tinkers and Technomancers (The Whitfield Files Book One) is a steampunk romance—here’s the book info…

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#ThrowbackThursday ~ The Dirigible King’s Daughter by Alys West ~ A #Steampunk Romance @AlysWestYork

Renee at It’s Book Talk began this meme as a way to share old favourites, as well as books that have been waiting on the ‘to be read’ pile for however long, and are finally getting an airing.

This week I’m revisiting The Dirigible King’s Daughter, a steampunk romance published in 2016.

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Guest Post by J.C. Norman #author of Sphere’s Divide #Fantasy @AuthorightUKPR @gilbster1000

Story telling in the 21st century

by J.C. Norman

As far as I can remember, I have always loved a good story. I think even one of my earliest memories was watching films such as Conan the Barbarian with my dad. Also as a 90s child I was also subject to many different kinds of animations and so have given myself a very open mind when it comes to stories and have always found time to explore as many as I could. That being said I wanted to point out the sad truth the many of the great stories will never be seen and appreciated by people who love fiction and stories, all because of the format of how the story is told. Many people I know do not read books and a few more have never read a book in their lives. Other stories again will never be shared because they are now told on a pc or console. It’s not anybody’s fault however, only that most people either simply do not have the time nor expenses to buy into such things or are dissuaded by the stigma that comes with most games. For that is what they are after all, only games. But I always like to try and point out to people outside the community that there is a very large difference in the games that separate the players from the online, competitive players, to the shut in, story based campaigners. Continue reading

The Pickpocket (The Viper and the Urchin #0.5) by Celine Jeanjean #UrbanFantasy #TuesdayBookBlog @CelineJeanjean

  • 32058062Author: Celine Jeanjean
  • Published: September 2016 by Enoki Press
  • Category: Urban Fantasy, Steampunk
  • five-stars

Rory is a seven-year-old starveling, carving out a survival for herself down on the docks of Damsport. When Daria, an older girl and talented pickpocket, suggests they team up to con Damsians out of their purses, Rory accepts at once. 

Rory just about survives on Tinsbury Dock by scavenging whatever scraps she can find. It’s a constant struggle to ease the hunger pangs, and being so tiny left Rory last in line when there was a fight for whatever bits of food were available. Rory knows when not to get involved and accepts the way things are. She sleeps in a dilapidated house peopled by beggars and drunks, but still manages to find beauty in the sky at sunset and enjoys sitting on the roof. Continue reading

The Dirigible King’s Daughter by Alys West reviewed for #RBRT #TuesdayBookBlog @AlysWestYork A #Steampunk Romance

  • 51uQrZJpsELAuthor: Alys West
  • Published: August 2016 by 
  • Category: Steampunk, Romance
  • four-half-stars

When Harriet Hardy moved to Whitby, newly famous from Mr Stoker’s sensational novel, she thought she’d left her past and her father’s disgrace behind her. But then an amorous Alderman and a mysterious Viscount turn her life upside down and she’s never been more grateful that she doesn’t leave home without her pistol. 

It’s clear Harriet Hardy, a supporter of the Suffragette movement, is not a woman to trifle with nor underestimate. We meet her as she loads the pistol she keeps in her reticule, before meeting a client. She owns and runs the property letting business left to her by her Uncle Humphrey. Harriet and her mother were left destitute after her father’s disgrace and subsequent death years before and if not for Uncle Humphrey, Harriet dare not think what might have happened to them. Continue reading