Opening lines from a few books on my reading list #Books #Reading #TBR

It’s a good while since I’ve put together an opening lines post, but rather than favourite opening lines from books I’ve already read as I’ve done previously, I’m choosing some samples from the books on my TBR.

From Listening Still by Anne Griffin

57693425Jeanie Masterson has a gift: she can hear the last words of the dead.
Passed down from generation to generation, this gift means she is able to make wrongs right, to give voice to unspoken love and dying regrets. She and her father have worked happily alongside each other for years, but now he’s unexpectedly announced that he wants to retire early and leave the business to her and her life is called into question.

The minute my father told me he was retiring and handing Masterson Funeral Directors to me, I wanted to run. Run to the edges of this world, to teeter on its sheer cliff tops, to lift my head skyward, to breathe in the air that demanded nothing of me. To let that freedom from expectation reach each extremity, smoothing every crease and frown, unfurling my tightly gripped fists.

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Stand Out Reads of 2021 #Books #Reading #TuesdayBookBlog

This year wasn’t a particularly good one, not the books themselves but my reading. The year started off horribly, losing my lovely Finn. Then it was the advent of the dreaded virus, coupled with moving house. The motivation to read came and went and I haven’t read nearly as many books as usual.  And Flynn came into our lives and my time wasn’t my own! 

The following are snippets from the books that stood out for me this year. If you’d like to read the full review please click on the title.

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The Moon Over Kilmore Quay by @HappyMrsH #ContemporaryFiction #Family #TuesdayBookBlog

41PKLeSyuyLAuthor: Carmel Harrington

Published: May 2021 by HarperCollins

Category: Contemporary Fiction, Romance, Family

⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️

Brooklyn, New York,
Bea has grown up in the heart of the Irish community, always hearing stories of home. When she discovers a letter from her younger self, written years before, it sends her deep into her own family history.

Kilmore Quay, Ireland.
Years earlier, Lucy Mernagh leaves her much-loved home and family in search of the New York dream. The Big Apple is a world away from the quiet village she grew up in, and the longing for home aches within her.

Bea O’Connor, one of the second generation of Irish immigrants born in Brooklyn, always felt that Ireland was a large part of her heritage and who she was. She’d grown up listening to the nostalgic stories told by her grandparents and dreamed of Ireland and visiting there one day. She’s torn between her love of New York and the call of Ireland, not knowing quite where she belongs.

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