Book Tour ~ The After House by Michael Phillip Cash #GuestPost #Giveaway @michaelpcash @ebookreviewgal

Welcome to the book tour for The After House. Today we have a guest post from the author, Michael Phillip Cash, and the chance to win a copy of the book.

Continue reading

#Guest Post by @lee_leecockburn #author of Porcelain: Flesh of Innocents @AuthorightUKPR #SpringReads

Welcome, Lee, and thank you for this thought provoking post. I’m sure I’m not the only one who forgets sometimes what police officers deal with on a daily basis.

Experiences in the police which have influenced my life.

The police has influenced my life in many ways, I am far more aware of my surroundings and who is standing in my company.  I serve proudly and I respect the job we do, it is hard and very busy, sometimes dangerous, sometimes sad, frightening and sometimes very rewarding.

I have had my eyes opened to how other people live their lives, those less fortunate than myself and many others.  Children, unloved, uncared for, never taught to respect, to love, to achieve, to believe that they are worth something, living close to squalor due to alcoholism and drug abuse by their parents, underfed, living in poverty.  They finally find their place amongst like individuals, where they are accepted and wanted, ready to anything for the group to fit in, this usually ends up in crime, going out and taking what they don’t have themselves, with no remorse and a sense of righteousness, because they have never had.  How can we, that have lived our lives, loved and well cared for, ever understand what these people have had to endure, just to get by and why they now do what they do now.  We still have our job to do, which is to prevent crime and solve crime that has been committed and bring those to justice, but we have to work to try and break the cycle of crime itself. Continue reading

#GuestPost by Laura Gascoigne #author ~ The Horse’s Arse #Excerpt @gilbster1000 #SundayBlogShare

 Welcome to my stop of the blog tour for The Horse’s Arse with a guest post from the author and an excerpt from the book.

Birth of the hero of The Horse’s Arse

If you’ve ever edited a specialist magazine you’ll know it’s a hamster wheel you can never get off. Round and round it goes – planning, commissioning, writing, editing, designing – often leaving the editor no time to pursue the specialism that got them the job in the first place. From 1994-99 I edited Artists & Illustrators magazine, and during those five years I went to fewer exhibitions and private views than at any other time in my life, being usually chained to my desk at private view time. But one exhibition I made an exception for. An invitation card arrived with a painting of the Thames at Wapping that I had to see. No other artist I knew of was painting like this, and I decided to go along and ask him for an interview. Continue reading

Guest Post by Robert Germaux @RGermaux #Author of Grammar Sex and Other Stuff #Giveaway @ebookreviewgal

Welcome to this blog tour stop for Grammar Sex (and other stuff) We have a guest post from the author, Robert Germaux and a chance to win a copy of the book.

“Davy Crockett, Jesus and The Beatles”

By Robert Germaux

I’ve always loved to sing, and when I was younger, my voice was good enough that I sang in both my church and school choirs. The main memories I have of my church singing are of two very different situations. For two or three years when I was around ten or eleven, I soloed in front of the congregation on Easter Sunday, singing There is a Green Hill Far Away. I didn’t particularly enjoy those performances, mostly because I didn’t like the heavy robe everyone in the choir had to wear. However, my other church-singing experience involved an entirely different ensemble, one that I definitely enjoyed wearing. When I was nine years old, our church held a father and son banquet, and I got up and sang The Ballad of Davy Crockett. I went full frontiersman on that occasion, including, of course, the coonskin cap. A couple of my siblings claim to be in possession of photographic evidence of that event, which explains why I’ve played the role of victim in a number of family blackmail schemes over the years. Continue reading

Blog Tour #Guest post by #Author Richard Daniel Curtis @AuthorightUKPR @thekidcalmer

Welcome to my stop on The Kid Calmer blog tour, with a guest post from the author, Richard Daniel Curtis.

Too Cool for You – How to deal with your teenage child wanting to separate from you

By Richard Daniel Curtis

The Kid Calmer and author of The Parent’s Guide to the Modern World

It was bound to happen sooner or later, but you weren’t expecting it this soon, your child is about to reject you because you’re not cool enough.  You may think they’re growing up too fast, but in their mind you are holding them back.  It’s something that happens to most parents and carers of teenagers at some time or another, but it’s not your fault…

Let me tell you a bit about what’s happening in the brain to begin with.  Prior to puberty the brain develops millions of new neurons in the grey matter surrounding the brain.  During puberty, the wiring of these means that the frontal lobes are shut down.  This is important, as this region of the brain, particularly the prefrontal cortex, is the part that holds your personality, your judgement skills, your behaviour, your social skills, ability to use expressive language – the things you see many teenagers lacking.  That’s all down to this rewiring, but in terms of personality you may notice the same loss, some teenagers respond to everything as threats during this time and withdraw from those around them.  Very often they’re desperate to belong to groups and so do what they can to survive and be part of the social circle – this will often result in a pulling away from parents. Continue reading

Character #Spotlight & #Extract from The Frog Theory by Fiona Mordaunt @AuthorightUKPR #TuesdayBookBlog

Character Spotlight on Kim

When I was younger, the pub become a huge part of my life because I realised that I had a talent for playing pool and it was the only place I could play. I was under age but I looked older than I was and regulations were not so strict then, so I got away with it.

All sorts of people would participate – students, business people, cab drivers – many from the surrounding council estates. I made many friends.

Two guys stood slightly apart from the crowd and all the girls just loved them, including me! I was too young for them even to glance in my direction (their radar was better than the landlord’s). Kim and Flow are loosely based on them. Continue reading

Guest Post by J.C. Norman #author of Sphere’s Divide #Fantasy @AuthorightUKPR @gilbster1000

Story telling in the 21st century

by J.C. Norman

As far as I can remember, I have always loved a good story. I think even one of my earliest memories was watching films such as Conan the Barbarian with my dad. Also as a 90s child I was also subject to many different kinds of animations and so have given myself a very open mind when it comes to stories and have always found time to explore as many as I could. That being said I wanted to point out the sad truth the many of the great stories will never be seen and appreciated by people who love fiction and stories, all because of the format of how the story is told. Many people I know do not read books and a few more have never read a book in their lives. Other stories again will never be shared because they are now told on a pc or console. It’s not anybody’s fault however, only that most people either simply do not have the time nor expenses to buy into such things or are dissuaded by the stigma that comes with most games. For that is what they are after all, only games. But I always like to try and point out to people outside the community that there is a very large difference in the games that separate the players from the online, competitive players, to the shut in, story based campaigners. Continue reading

Guest Post from Sam Taylor-Pye #author of Goldsmith Jones ~ plus #Extract #BlogTour @authorightUKPR @gilbster1000

The anxious manic novelist: doing an MA 

by Sam Taylor-Pye

I started writing my novel the summer before starting an MA in creative writing. I had my main character pretty fleshed out. The storyline was chugging along nicely. And some of the dialogue scenes I felt were sounding impressive. I figured the degree was where I’d hone my already amazing skills and by the end I’d have, not only a certificate, but also a NYT bestseller, and possibly a lucrative deal with Netflix.

So when October came around, and classes started, I was feeling fairly confident and eager to get going. 

The first thing we had to do was submit a novel synopsis, and a couple of first chapters for something called a ‘critique’. I wasn’t worried. In fact I was elated. 

Euphoric even.  Continue reading

Gilding The Lily by @JustineCJohn ~ #Blog Tour ~ Guest Post #TuesdayBookBlog @authorightUKPR @gilbster1000

gilding-the-lilyA gripping mystery of jealousy, murder and lies.

An invitation to her estranged, wealthy father’s surprise 75th birthday party in New York sees Amelia and her husband, Jack, set off across the pond to meet a whole new world of family politics.

Amelia, now a successful businesswoman, feels guilty about never liking her father’s women, so does her upmost to give his new socialite partner, Evelyn, the benefit of the doubt. Wouldn’t it be nice if they could just all get along? But there’s something very dark, determined and dangerous about her…

When Amelia’s father, Roger, becomes ill, Jack grows suspicious that there is more to it. Amelia understands why, but no one else will believe them. They travel back to America to piece together the puzzle, but when Roger goes missing, the couple are driven to their wits’ end. It takes a DEA officer and a secret assassin to bring them answers, but the ruthless truth is something no one expected…

Book links ~ Amazon UK | US

Justine’s insight into the character of Amelia. 

Amelia is a tall, intelligent and elegant lady in her mid-40s.  She has dark blonde hair and loves to travel.  She runs a small recruitment agency in London which she is, and always has been determined to make successful.  She has high hopes for her company and hopes to expand it.   Continue reading

Guest Post from #author Dr Vivien Newman @worldwarwomen ~ Extraordinary #Women #WW1 #History #SundayBlogShare

Don’t ask a woman her age … and expect the truth

That boys lied about their ages to enlist in 1914 is common knowledge.  Less well known is that women did too.  This blog features two unusual women who felt age was no bar to ‘doing their bit’.

Under age munitions worker Mabel Lethbridge

Under age munitions worker Mabel Lethbridge

In 1917, Mabel Lethbridge was desperate to become a ‘mutionette’ and work in the Danger Sheds where highly explosive materials were handled; the minimum age was 18.  A rebellious teenager, she was accepted at 7 National Filling Factory at Hayes Common.  On her way to work on her first morning, she rather dismissed the comments of a woman in the bus queue who, hearing Mabel’s destination, comfortingly confided, this was “one of them terrible places … twelve months come Christmas I lost my eldest … all blowed to bits she was … we never got her body home.”

In Mabel’s Shed, dangers extended beyond high explosives.  The machinery they were using to fill shells with amatol had been condemned over a year ago; replacements had arrived but were not yet operational.  Soon disaster struck,

A dull flash, a deafening roar and I felt myself being hurled through the air, falling down, down into the darkness.  A blinding flash and I felt my body being torn asunder.  Darkness, that terrifying darkness, and the agonised cries of the workers pierced my consciousness.  (Mabel Lethbridge Fortune’s Grass) Continue reading