#SpotlightFeature ~ The Afrikaner by Arianna Dagnino @aridagni #GuestPost #FridayReads

Today I’m showcasing The Afrikaner by Arianna Dagnino, described as ‘ a hybrid form that mixes history, science, magic & the love for the outdoors.’

I asked Arianna if she could tell us about the inspiration for The Afrikaner and her time as an international reporter…

Landing from what was then regarded as “enlightened”, free and democratic Europe and finding ourselves in the turmoil of a society caught in dramatic transition – between the end of apartheid (the 40-year long period of racial segregation imposed on the peoples of South Africa) and the first democratically elected black government. Those were the years, 1996-2000 in which my husband and I worked in South Africa as international reporters for the Italian press. 

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#ThrowbackThursday ~ A Visit to the Historic City of Stirling #Scotland #Places #Photography

A different throwback thursday this week, looking back to October 2017 when we spent a few days in Scotland. One of the places we visited was Stirling.

The approach to Stirling is impressive with this incredible view of Stirling Castle perched on top of the cliff. Its position was important in the line of defence and the town was granted a Royal Charter in the 12th century. It was witness to battles against the English during the Wars of Independence, including The Battle of Stirling Bridge and Bannockburn.

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A visit to the #GraceDarling Museum in Bamburgh #History #Photography

We had a very interesting visit to the small but very informative RNLI Grace Darling museum during our last trip to Bamburgh. Free entry, lots of historical details, exhibits and videos and friendly staff ensure a pleasant experience. Donations are welcomed but not obligatory and there’s a small shop area as you enter. There are two downstairs areas with interactive models of Longstone Lighthouse and an account of the Darlings’ life at the lighthouse. (Please click on photos if you’d like the full size)

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Bella Toscana by Nanette Littlestone #Romance Across The Ages #BookReview for #RBRT #FridayReads

Author: Nanette Littlestone

Published: December 2018 by Words of Passion

Category: Contemporary, Romance, History, Book Review

An explosive yearning that can’t be denied

Disturbing visions from an ancient past

A mysterious stranger that somehow feels familiar

On the night of her fiftieth birthday, the comfortable ride of Toscana’s life takes an alarming plunge. Haunted by seductive visions, she tries to push aside the desire and focus on the husband who adores her. 

Toscana Blake has an organised, if not perfect, life. She’s content in her marriage to Jackson. Acknowledging the fact it may not be a passionate union, Toscana feels a deep affection for her husband and appreciates the life they have.

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Whitby Abbey Ruins #Photography Yorkshire

The impressive ruins of Whitby Abbey are perched on a headland overlooking the town of Whitby and the North Sea, and are said to have been the inspiration for Bram Stoker’s Dracula, along with certain areas of the town.

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Katharina: Deliverance (Katharina #1) by Margaret Skea #HistoricalFiction @margaretskea1 #FridayReads

Author: Margaret Skea

Published: October 2017 by Sanderling Books

Category: Historical Fiction, Book Review

Following the death of her mother and her father’s remarriage, five-year-old Katharina is placed in the convent at Brehna. She will never see her father again.

Sixty-five miles away, at Erfurt in Thuringia, Martin Luder, a promising young law student, turns his back on a lucrative career in order to become a monk.

The consequences of their meeting in Wittenberg, on Easter Sunday 1523, will reverberate down the centuries and throughout the Christian world.

Margaret Skea has painted a convincing and sympathetic portrait of Katharina Von Bora, who became the wife of Martin Luther, despite the fact that little is known about her. As the author states: this is a fictionalised account of how her early life might have been. The story is a combination of fiction and the facts gleaned by the author through thorough research.

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Plas Mawr ~ #Historic House in Conwy #Elizabethan #Photography #Ghosts

I hadn’t gone out with the intention of taking photographs, so didn’t have my camera. This was too good an opportunity to miss though, so out came the phone.

Plas Mawr was thought to be the finest town house of the Elizabethan period in Britain. 

The owner, Robert Wynn, was a prosperous merchant who loved grandeur. His house, built between 1576 and 1585, said to have cost around £800, reflects his status and wealth. 

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The Constant Soldier by William Ryan #WWII #HistoricalFiction @WilliamRyan_ #TuesdayBookBlog

  • Author: William Ryan
  • Published: This edition, June 2017 by Pan
  • Category: WWII, Historical Fiction, Books, Reading

The pain woke him up. He was grateful for it. The train had stopped and somewhere, up above them, the drone of aircraft engines filled the night sky. He could almost remember her smile . . . It must be the morphine . . . He had managed not to think about her for months now.

It’s 1944 and Paul Brandt, a German soldier, horrifically wounded and returning from the front, is on a hospital train bound for recuperation, convalescence and finally, home and his father. The village he had left years before, and the people, were not the same.  By the same token, neither was Paul. His experiences have left him demoralised and guilt ridden. Continue reading